Materia Conference
Jun
2
9:00 am09:00

Materia Conference

  • Hayden Library, MIT

NEW APPROACHES TO MATERIAL TEXT IN THE ROMAN WORLD 2017

MATERIA: New Approaches to Material Text in the Roman World is a day-long workshop presenting new research in the area of the ancient book in the Roman World, broadly conceived. This event brings together six speakers from across the country who work on different aspects of the intersection of classical text and material culture to present work in progress. Each speaker will have a significant block of time to present his/her findings, with ample time for questions and feedback from the audience and fellow panelists. Audience members are encouraged to come for length of the day, throughout which refreshments will be provided.

This event is organized by Prof. Stephanie Frampton (MIT) and Prof. Joseph Howley (Columbia) and is made possible by the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Dean of the School of the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at MIT, in collaboration with the Institute for Digital Archaeology and the History of the Book at Harvard.

SCHEDULE

Thursday, June 1 2017—Houghton Library, Harvard University

3:00-5:00 | Practical session (optional) - Meet the organizers and speakers and see classical items from Harvard's collection (attendance limited). Reception to follow.

Friday, June 2 2017—Killian Hall (14W-111), Hayden Library, MIT

9:00-9:15 | Coffee

9:15-9:30 | Welcome - Stephanie Frampton (MIT)

9:30-10:45 | Session 1 - Joseph Howley (Columbia), Finding Distinction in the Ashes: Book-burning and Media Genres in Ancient Rome

10:45-11:00 | Coffee

11:00-12:15 | Session 2 -  Kyle Conrau-Lewis (Yale), Contesting the Page: Editing the Paratexts of Valerius Maximus

12:15-1:00 | Lunch

1:00-2:15 | Session 3 - Irene Peirano Garrison (Yale), Autograph Manuscripts and Authenticity: The Affective Power of the Original

2:15-3:30 |  Session 4 - Jane Raisch (Berkeley), Order and the Reader in Propertius Book 3

3:30-3:45 | Coffee

3:45-5:00 | Session 5 - Andrew Riggsby (UT Austin), Learning to Organize — by Organizing.

5:00-6:30 | Keynote Response - Kathy Coleman (Harvard)

 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Coffee and lunch will be served for pre-registered attendees. There is no fee to attend the MATERIA conference, but we do ask that you register in advance so that we can estimate catering and room capacity.  Please visit our Eventbrite page to register by May 15.  There, you can indicate whether you plan to attend the whole day or part of the day, and whether you wish to attend the practical session on Thursday afternoon.

CONTACT

For questions or more information, contact Stephanie Frampton.


Global Web Summit: Making Memories for a Virtual World
Nov
9
3:15 pm15:15

Global Web Summit: Making Memories for a Virtual World

  • Global Web Summit

Can 3D printing, VR, crowd-sourcing, vast digital archives and a massive amount of perseverance, make our heritage indestructible in a virtual world?

Rossitza Atanassova - Digital Curator, British Library

Roger Michel - Founder, The Institute for Digital Archaeology

Ed Humphrey - Digital Director, British Film Institute

David Harrison - Investigative TV Reporter, Al-Jazeera International

 

The Global Web Summit: 21 Conferences around the world

There is no longer such a thing as a ‘tech’ industry – just industries that have been affected by tech. Just as the first industrial revolution 250 years ago left an indelible mark on the lives of the people who lived through it, tech is turning upside down everything we thought about work, social interaction, politics and life itself.

This year 53,056 tech CEOs, founders, startups, investors and political leaders driving change across the world came together in Lisbon for Web Summit. Over 2,000 of the world’s leading media attended. Together, they discussed the answers to the questions posed by the tech revolution we’re living through.

 

 

Digital Technology for Heritage Preservation
Oct
27
7:00 pm19:00

Digital Technology for Heritage Preservation

  • Columbia University, Ware Lounge

Participants:
Lisa Ackerman, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, World Monuments Fund

Dietmar Offenhuber, Assistant Professor of Art + Design and Public Policy and Head of MFA in Information Design and Visualization, Northeastern University

Roger Michel, Founder and Executive Director, Institute for Digital Archaelogy

Holly Rushmeier, Professor of Computer Science, Yale University

Host:
Adam Lowe, Founder and Director of Factum Arte and Adjunct Professor of Historic Preservation, Columbia GSAPP

Over the recent years, 3D scanning has become part of a coherent and non-contact approach to the documentation of Cultural Heritage and its long term preservation. New developments in digital recording are appearing everyday and the academic community, relevant private and public institutions, media and general public, are increasingly interested in the growing possibilities such technological developments have to offer in the face of the important challenges related to the preservation of our shared Cultural Heritage.

But as the global expectations increase, different, and often contradictory approaches to the same problem start to arise, making it not uncommon for terms and concepts to be confused or misunderstood. In this roundtable discussion, we will discuss the facts related to digital technology and its political, cultural and economic implications. We will also seek to shed some light on basic questions such as:
- What does ‘high-resolution’ mean?
- What types of data are meaningful in the preservation of Cultural Heritage?
- How should digital technology be applied?

Bridge Over Troubled Water
Sep
22
6:00 pm18:00

Bridge Over Troubled Water

  • City Hall Park

The Triumphal Arch, City Hall Park

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

Celebrating memory, the power of history, and a shared vision for peace

“What could be more appropriate than to have this symbol of freedom in front of City Hall, so close to where we had our own challenges” Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen On Monday September 19th, the Institute for Digital Archaeology celebrated the official unveiling of their monumental scale reproduction of Palmyra’s Triumphal Arch with Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen, His Excellency Mohammed Al Gergawi, cultural luminaries from New York's theater and arts communities, the international media, and the people of New York. The public reception of the installation has been tremendous with thousands of New Yorkers coming to show their support for the gesture of friendship that it represents. Touchingly, it has has even become a popular venue for newly-wed couples to take their photographs. This Thursday, join the IDA for an evening of interpretive reflections on the eternalism of memory and the power of new technologies in the preservation, restoration, and celebration of history. Conversations will encompass the history of the Triumphal Arch, the science underpinning the installation, and the use of new technologies to broaden access and enliven the world of cultural heritage with special reference to our current tactile exhibition at the New York Public Library’s Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library. The evening will feature an acoustic tribute to the 35th anniversary of another memorable event in the history of New York’s great public Parks: Simon and Garfunkel's legendary Concert in the Park on September 19th 1981. We are delighted to be welcoming the highly acclaimed Melissa Stylianou and Pete McCann on vocals and instrumentalists John Suntken and Michael Forfia.

More information can be found at www.cityhallarch.org

All press inquiries should be sent to newyork@digitalarchaeology.org.uk or directed to Dr Alexy Karenowska on 1-646-520-5049

Designing Inclusive Cultural Experiences: Preserving the Past, Exploring the Future
Sep
20
6:00 pm18:00

Designing Inclusive Cultural Experiences: Preserving the Past, Exploring the Future

  • Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Books Library

PLEASE VISIT OUR COMPANION CULTURAL HERITAGE EVENT FOR VISION-IMPAIRED VISITORS AT THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

Designing Inclusive Cultural Experiences: Preserving the Past, Exploring the Future

Presented by the Institute for Digital Archeology

Tuesday, September 20, 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM, Andrew Heiskell Braille & Talking Book Library, 40 West 20th St | New York, NY 10011

THE EVENT

This event marks the opening of our new tactile exhibition “the architecture of identity, celebrating history and a shared vision for peace

Centered around Palmyra’s ancient triumphal arch, this exhibition represents the launch of a bigger project in collaboration with the UK’s Royal National Institute for the Blind, the USA’s National Federation of the Blind, and the New York public Library to develop and deploy 3D printing technology to help to make architectural cultural heritage — something which is traditionally very hard for those with sight difficulties to experience — more accessible. We aim, also, to draw attention to the extent to which emerging technologies have the power to transform the museum and gallery experience into one which is more welcoming, inclusive, and inspiring for those who cannot see.

A total of seven tactile exhibits complete with braille, large print, and audio exhibition guide will explore the key architectural and decorative features of this ancient structure. The exhibition will travel across the United States in parallel with a sister exhibition in the United Kingdom.

SCHEDULE

6:00 PM: Refreshments

6:20 PM: Opening Remarks

6:30 PM: Panel Discussion

8:00 PM: Exhibit Exploration

Open to the Public Wednesday September 21st to Tuesday October 11th

- Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 10am - 5pm

- Tuesday and Thursday 12noon - 7pm

MODERATORS

Chancey Fleet is the Assistive Technology Coordinator at NYPL's Andrew Heiskell Braille & Talking Book Library.  This branch, located in Flatiron and serving patrons of all abilities, provides one-on-one Information literacy coaching and community workshops that educate assistive technology users, as well as developers and designers, about what's possible with accessible technology. From braille and talking books to programs that support tech novices, power users, creators and lifelong learners, visittalkingbooks.nypl.org  to connect with a library of possibilities. 

Alexy Karenowska is a magnetician with a research group based in the University of Oxford, UK's Department of Physics, and is also Fellow by Special Election of Magdalen College Oxford. A trained engineer as well as a physicist, Karenowska directs the IDA's technical team. She has a particular interest in the application of 3D printing and machining technologies to the restoration or replication of damaged or destroyed archaeological structures and artefacts, and the development of new technologies for the characterization and the development of new technologies for the characterization, preservation and appreciation of heritage objects. 

Panelists

Rebecca McGinnis is the Senior Managing Educator for Accessibility at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She and her colleagues are internationally recognized for their innovative programs for people with disabilities. In 2013 she developed and co-taught Museums, Accessibility, and Technology, a semester-long course in the MFA in Design + Technology program at Parsons the New School for Design, with Don Undeen, then manager of The Met’s MediaLab and professor Katherine Moriwaki from Parsons. She isan adjunct lecturer in the Museum Studies Program at Johns Hopkins University, where she teaches Accessibility in the Museum. In 2014 the Met received the American Foundation for the Blind’s Access Award. In 2011 Rebecca received the LEAD Award for Excellence in Accessibility Leadership and the American Council of the Blind Achievement Award in Audio Description for Museums. Her publications include “Islands of Stimulation: Perspectives on the Museum Experience, Present and Future” in The Multisensory Museum: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Touch, Sound, Smell, Memory, and Space, ed. Nina Levent and Alvaro Pascual Leone, Rowman & Littlefield, 2014. She has MAs in Art History and Museum Studies and pursues a PhD in Cognitive Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Steve Landau founded Touch Graphics in 1998. The company has received numerous federal RD grants, and produces interactive tactile signs, exhibits, and learning aids, based on the outcomes of government-funded research.  These materials communicate spatial concepts through touch, vision and hearing. Recent projects include a network of 40 universal talking tactile maps for Google's NYC headquarters; interactive talking sculptures of a seahorse and penguin for Chicago's Shedd Aquarium, tactile painting panels for the National Gallery of Art, and a touch-responsive campus model for Overbrook School for the Blind. Steve studied art at Oberlin and design at Harvard.

Emilie Louise Gossiaux is an artist born and raised in New Orleans, and currently living in New York City. She began her undergraduate studies in the arts at the Cooper Union in 2007. Just before her Senior year, in 2010 she lost her vision due to a traumatic accident. After regaining her strength and independence, Gossiaux returned to the Cooper Union in 2013, and graduated with a BFA in 2014, with an award of excellence in sculpture. Upon graduating, Gossiaux began her year-long internship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with the Media Lab, and Access/Community programs. After completing her internship, she was hired as a Contractual Museum Educator, and is currently teaching blind and visually impaired visitors in the Seeing Through Drawing class, and has led several gallery talks for general audiences in Adult programs, exploring cross-sensory methods for experiencing art. As a practicing artist, Gossiaux has shown her sculptures and paintings in several art galleries and institutions around the world, including Pippy Houldsworth Gallery in London, Storefront Lab in San Francisco, Cantor Fine Arts Gallery in Los Angeles, 5 Press Gallery in New Orleans, Recess Gallery in New York City, and the Smithsonian Institute of Art in Washington D.C. In 2013, Gossiaux won an award of excellence from the VSA IN/FINITE EARTH Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and in 2014, she graduated from the Cooper Union with an Elliot Lash Memorial Prize for excellence in sculpture.

World Heritage Strategy Forum 2016
Sep
9
Sep 11

World Heritage Strategy Forum 2016

  • Loeb House
Photo Credit: T. Corey Brennan

Photo Credit: T. Corey Brennan

From 9-11 September, 2016, the Institute for Digital Archaeology, with support from the Dubai Future Foundation, will host the World Heritage Strategy Forum at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Venues for the meeting include the Peabody, Semitic and Harvard Art Museums, as well as historic Loeb House. A Diverse group of more than forty expert speakers will present talks on a broad range of subjects - from the Venice Charter to Victorian electrotyping to VR experiences of ancient sites, and much more. The conference sessions will be framed around three core themes: technical solutions to heritage conservation challenges, legal and policy frameworks for preserving heritage material, and exploring the present-day (and future) relevance of ancient objects and classical texts. In addition to formal talks, there will be technical demonstrations, panel discussions, hands-on workshops and fellowship - including receptions at the Peabody Museum and the Semitic Museum. 

Speakers hail from a huge variety of institutions and organizations, including UNESCO, CIPA-ICOMOS, the World Customs Organization, the Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums (Syria), the World Monuments Fund, the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, Harvard University, the University of Oxford, the University of Cambridge, the New York Public Library, Université de Toulouse, Wellesley College, Boston University, Universitá Iuav di Venezia, the University of South Carolina, the University of Kentucky, the Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology, the National Federation of the Blind, the Dubai Future Foundation, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In combination with the great settings provided by Harvard's magnificent museums, the dynamic program offerings will make for a valuable and memorable experience for participants. The Forum represents an outstanding opportunity to help shape policy around cultural heritage at a pivotal moment in history. 

Beyond Borders International Festival on Literature and Thought
Aug
28
12:00 pm12:00

Beyond Borders International Festival on Literature and Thought

  • Traquair Scotland

War on Heritage

Why do warring parties destroy culture and heritage? How can societies reclaim it? Join a discussion of the importance of protecting cultural heritage, and the challenges of preventing destruction in times of war. With David Pratt, British Museum archaeologist Jonathan Tubb, Roger Michel from the Institute for Digital Archaeology, Rim Turkami, and biographer of buildings James Crawford. 

The Mosaic Rooms: Future Preservation
Jul
27
7:00 pm19:00

The Mosaic Rooms: Future Preservation

  • The Mosaic Rooms

Brendan Cormier, Christina Riggs and Alexy Karenowska discuss the role of digital fabrication technologies and archaeological practice in global heritage preservation.  They discuss the future of museums in our transnational and postcolonial world.

Brendan Cormier is a design curator at the Victoria and Albert Museum. He recently curated A World of Fragile Parts for the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, which explores the possibilities of new digital fabrication technologies to help in global heritage preservation. He is also concurrently lead curator of a new V&A Gallery in Shenzhen.

Christina Riggs is a Reader at the University of East Anglia, specializing in Egyptology. She has written about ancient Egyptian art, museum collecting, and the colonial history of archaeology. As a curator at the Manchester Museum, she was involved in the Alchemy contemporary art project, featuring Mark Dion’s ’The Bureau of the Centre for the Study of Surrealism and its Legacy’ (2005). Christina is working on a book about photography and the 1920s discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb.

Alexy Karenowska is the Director of Technology at The Institute for Digital Archaeology, an organization dedicated to finding innovative technology-driven options for the documentation and preservation of heritage material. Alexy’s work is particularly focused on the application of 3D printing and machining technologies to the restoration or replication of damaged or destroyed archaeological structures and artefacts.

Conference on Digitization of Cultural Heritage
Jun
29
10:00 am10:00

Conference on Digitization of Cultural Heritage

The IDA will attend the Netherlands Ministry of Education, Culture and Science Conference on Digitization of Cultural Heritage, hosted in collaboration with the EU Presidency in the Netherlands. 

In the Framework of the Netherlands’ Presidency of the EU, the Netherlands Ministry of Education, Culture and Science organizes a conference on the challenges in connecting digital cultural heritage collections cross-domain a cross- border and to explore the (unpaved) roads towards finding and serving wider audiences. Venue of the conference will be the EU Presidency building in the historic city centre of Amsterdam.

The conference will bring together some 40 international speakers and 250 participants from the culture, the heritage and the digitization sectors as well as ‘users’ of digitized content such as schools, the tourism industry and the wider creative sector and representatives from the EU institutions and EU Member States.

More Information can be found here: https://b-com.mci-group.com/EventPortal/Information/EventInformation.aspx?EventInformationPageCode=WELCOME&EventCode=OCWEUCDCH

The Mediterranean in Crisis: Seeking Global Solutions to Critical Regional and Local Issues
Jun
21
Jun 22

The Mediterranean in Crisis: Seeking Global Solutions to Critical Regional and Local Issues

  • Stavros Niarchos Foundation

Members of the IDA will travel to Thessaloniki in late June to attend the annual Stavros Niarchos Foudnation Conference. This years conference will focus on providing a global forum for Mediterranean and Balkan societies to confront issues on local and regional levels. 

More information is available here: http://www.snf.org/media/5065091/PC-2016-Program.pdf

Bathurst Society Lecture and Dinner
Jun
18
4:00 pm16:00

Bathurst Society Lecture and Dinner

  • Trinity College

On June 18th, Mr. Roger Michel and Dr. Alexy Karenowska will present the annual Bathurst Society Lecture at Trinity College Oxford in collaboration with the Ashmolean Museum. The lecture will cover the work of the IDA in reconstruction and the importance of cultural heritage preservation in the world today. 

#unite4heritage: Cultural Diversity Under Attack
Jun
9
Jun 10

#unite4heritage: Cultural Diversity Under Attack

  • UNESCO

From June 9-10th, members of the IDA will attend a high-level technical event hosted by UNESCO in Brussels, Belgium. The conference is hosted in partnership with the European Union. 

Programme Summary

Cultural Diplomacy

Protecting Cultural Rights in Protracted Crisis

Culture and Arts for Dialogue

Conflict Resolution and Stabilization Culture for Recovery

Rehabilitation and Resilience

Working with Law Enforcement to Protect Cultural Property

Emergency Safeguarding of Syria's Cultural Heritage
Jun
2
Jun 4

Emergency Safeguarding of Syria's Cultural Heritage

  • UNESCO

From June 2nd to June 4th, archaeologists, cultural heritage specialists and other experts will gather at UNESCO in Berlin to discuss emergency measures to safeguard Syrian Cultural Heritage. The initiative, which is part of the larger UNESCO program 'Emergency Safeguarding of Syria's Cultural Heritage', will aim to both raise awareness and begin creating a plan of action. 

Read more here: https://en.unesco.org/syrian-observatory/emergency-safeguarding-syrian-cultural-heritage-project

Venice Biennale
May
26
Nov 27

Venice Biennale

  • Campo Monte Grappa

On May 25th, in collaboration with London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, the IDA unveiled a major Palmyra-themed exhibit at the Venice Biennale, the premiere exhibition site for the latest innovations in art and architecture world-wide.   The exhibition, which will run from May to November, and which will be seen by more than a half -million visitors, features elements of Palmyra’s Triumphal Arch, including the ornate keystone.  The goal of the installation is to provoke discussion about the role of historic reconstruction in preserving and curating ancient sites and to bring attention to the new digital technologies available for this purpose.  In addition to the exhibition reception, the IDA also hosted a dinner in the former home of Lord Byron on Venice’s Grand Canale for museum officials from the Italy and the UK to promote discussions about the future of architectural reconstruction in the museum context.

Urbicide Syria
Apr
8
9:00 am09:00

Urbicide Syria

  • Universita Iuav di Venezia

Dr. Alexy Karenowska and Roger Michel will participate in a discussion on postwar reconstruction at the Universita luav di Venezia. 

Lectures and discussion include: Talal Akili, Firas Hawasly, Sultan Barakat, Salma Samar Damluji, Farrokh Derakshani, Paolo Fabbri, Omar Abdulaziz Hallaj, Manar Hammad, Jorge Lobos, Zki Mehchy, Roger Michel, Alexy Karenowska, Nasser Rabbat, Iyas Shahin, Ziad Mouhanna, Jamal Al Ahmar. 

 

 

Cultural Heritage in Crisis: Digital Solutions for a Modern World
Mar
2
2:00 pm14:00

Cultural Heritage in Crisis: Digital Solutions for a Modern World

  • Boston University

Benjamin Altshuler will discuss the current state of cultural heritage preservation and the methods being used to save and document artifacts and sites around the world. Mr. Altshuler, as field director for the Million Image Database, has conducted field work in Reflectance Transformation Imaging and 3D Photogrammetry. His talk will feature examples of these techniques from sites in Sicily, the Middle East and North Africa. 

Aerial Archaeology in Jordan and Beyond
Mar
2
Apr 6

Aerial Archaeology in Jordan and Beyond

  • Royal Geographical Society
  • Wednesday 2 March to Wednesday 6 April
  • Monday to Friday 10am-5pm (closed Good Friday 25 March and Easter Monday 27 March)
  • Saturdays 5, 12, 19, 26 March and 2 April 10.00am – 4.00pm
  • Exhibition Road pavilion
  • Free entry

An international team of archaeologists has been exploring Jordan’s rich archaeological heritage from the air. The exhibition will showcase sites from the prehistoric period, as well as Greek, Roman, Christian and Islamic period archaeology, The exhibition will also include twentieth century remnants from the First World War (see www.apaame.org).

During their expeditions they have not only discovered new sites, but also recorded a significant change in the Jordanian landscape that has affected Jordan’s archaeology. Many sites which were once isolated or untouched have become enveloped by urban and village development, or been affected by agricultural practices. The photographs also show illegal looting of artefacts from significant archaeological sites.

The project has provided the springboard for a broader project on Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa, recording archaeological sites using satellite imagery and historic air photographs.

http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/Exhibitions/Aerial+archaeology+in+Jordan+and+beyond.htm

Re-writing History with 3D Printing: World Government Summit 2016
Feb
8
5:30 pm17:30

Re-writing History with 3D Printing: World Government Summit 2016

  • Madinat Jumeirah

Roger Michel, Alexy Karenowska and Emma Dench spoke in conversation with the Executive Director of the Dubai Museum of the Future, Saif Al Aleeli about the importance of cultural heritage preservation, the Million Image Database and the future of education in the Classics. 

https://worldgovernmentsummit.org/summit/agenda-2016/sessions/re-writing-history-with-3d-printing

Government Summit 2016: Million Image Database Unveiling
Feb
8
Feb 10

Government Summit 2016: Million Image Database Unveiling

  • Government Summit 2016

The Institute for Digital Archaeology will unveil the Million Image Database in conjunction with the Museum of the Future and the United Arab Emirates. 

The unveiling will take place at the Government Summit 2016, a global platform dedicated to developing the future of government and enhancing excellence in government by gathering officials, thought leaders, thinkers, policy makers and private sector leaders to discuss the best ways to develop the future of government, based on the latest developments and future trends in government.

The 4th Government Summit titled "Shaping Future Governments", will be held from 8-10 February 2016 under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Vice President, Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai. It focuses on shaping governments of the future and enhancing performance of delivering their services through innovation in government. The Summit also aims to strengthen cooperation and coordination between governments, and to promote the exchange of knowledge and experience about best innovative global practices in the public sector.

The Future of the Past: Digitizing Cultural Property in an Era of Destruction
Jan
22
Jan 23

The Future of the Past: Digitizing Cultural Property in an Era of Destruction

  • Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery

Symposium associated with the exhibition “The Missing: Rebuilding the Past

Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice

City University of New York

Symposium: Friday, January 22, 2016, 3-5 pm

 Demonstration of the immersive virtual reality project, Nimrud Rising

Friday, January 22, 1-3 pm, Saturday, January 23, 1-5 pm

Shiva Gallery, John Jay College

(entrance at 860 11th Ave., New York, NY, between 58-59th Streets)

RSVPs to ethompson@jjay.cuny.edu requested but not required

            In 2015, ISIS created a number of videos whose elaborate production values and sophisticated release strategy over multiple social media channels contrasted with their brutal content – the destruction of cultural heritage artworks and sites by sledgehammers, bulldozers, and explosives. Yet, the same digital and internet technologies that insurgent groups such as ISIS are using for propaganda, recruitment, funding, and strategizing can also be used to monitor, preserve, and even stop the destruction of cultural heritage.

            This symposium offers a roundtable conversation among scholars, artists, and technological pioneers working at the leading edge of digital cultural heritage. They will discuss the promises and perils of new technologies – what will we gain? what might we lose? – as well as explain their visions for the most crucial projects and the most interesting technologies and strategies. Audience participation is expected and encouraged.

            On January 22 and 23, we will also present “Nimrud Rising,” an immersive virtual reality project in beta. The Northern Iraqi city of Nimrud was barrel bombed by ISIL in March. This VR project says no to ISIL’s destruction and seeks to resurrect the city, allowing visitors from around the world to visit using VR goggles and learn about its history and heritage. Presented with the Antiquities Coalition and Learning Sites, Inc.

Confirmed Speakers

Morehshin Allahyari: Iranian new media artist and art activist who now lives and works in the United States, whose work,Material Speculation: ISIS, a project recently profiled by Vice, is featured in the exhibition. The project uses 3D modeling and 3D printing to reconstruct artifacts from Mosul Museum in Iraq, smashed by ISIS fighters in 2015. Allahyari’s labor-intensive process of digitally sculpting the works using the spare surviving photographic documentation of these objects from a museum that was too under-funded to achieve full photographic inventory documentation of its holdings will ultimately lead to making 3D printable files for the objects available online for use by any interested member of the public.

Peter Herdrich: Co-founder of the Antiquities Coalition, dedicated to the fight against looting and the illicit trade in antiquities, and CEO of Cultural Capital, consulting with business, government, and not-for-profits on communications, media strategy, and production. Herdrich served as the CEO of the Archaeological Institute of America, the world’ largest archaeological organization and as publisher of Archaeology magazine. He is an award-winning television news producer and has produced and written for ABC, CBS, Fox, Disney, USA, and 20th Television.

Donald H. Sanders: President of Learning Sites, Inc., with 19 years of experience creating digitally reconstructed ancient sites for interactive education and research, including the immersive virtual reality “Nimrud Rising” project, the only visualization of the Northwest Palace of King Ashur-nasir-pal II, Nimrud (Assyria, present-day Iraq), destroyed by ISIS in 2015. Parts of this project have been featured in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “From Assyria to Iberia” exhibition, and Dr. Sanders will demonstrate the virtual reality experience in the Shiva Gallery to interested visitors on January 23, 2016.

Erin Thompsonfaculty member at John Jay College and America’s only full-time professor of art crime. Thompson studies the damage done to humanity’s shared heritage through looting, theft, and the deliberate destruction of art. Currently, she is researching the ways in which terrorist groups both sell and destroy art in order to support their genocidal campaigns. Thompson has discussed art crime topics in The New York Times and on CNN, NPR, Al Jazeera America, and the Freakonomics podcast.

Clement Valla: a Brooklyn-based artist and assistant professor of Graphic Design at the Rhode Island School of Design, whose digital recreations of ancient objects are an Artforum Critics Pick. Valla contributed a work, Wrapped terracotta krater with lid surmounted by a small hydria, to the exhibit, using digital technology to capture a 3D image of a 7th century B.C.E. vase on display at the Metropolitan Museum, producing a sculpture that both carefully reproduces and shatters the original vase.

“The Missing” runs 1-5 pm, Monday-Friday, or by appointment, through February 5, 2016. FOR MORE INFORMATIONplease see www.themissingexhibit.com or contact: gallery@jjay.cuny.edu212-237-1439, or the curators, Erin Thompson (ethompson@jjay.cuny.edu; www.artcrimeprof.com) and Thalia Vrachopoulos (tvrachopoulos@jjay.cuny.edu).

Friends of the Herculaneum Society Lecture: Brent Seales
Jan
16
4:00 pm16:00

Friends of the Herculaneum Society Lecture: Brent Seales

  • Ioannou Centre for

Brent Seales, Professor and Chair, Department of Computer Science,
University of Kentucky, will address the Friends of Herculaneum
Society Saturday 16 January at 4:00 pm in the Ioannou Centre, 66 St
Giles, Oxford. Advert below; all are most welcome - RSVP to
herculaneum@classics.oxford.ac.uk


"More Advances in Digital Unwrapping: Homer, Herculaneum and the
Scroll from Ein Gedi"

Progress over the past fifteen years in the digitisation and analysis
of texts found in cultural objects (inscriptions, manuscripts,
scrolls) led last year to the astonishing discovery of eight verses of
Leviticus deep inside a carbonised scroll from the ancient synagogue
at Ein Gedi, Israel. This paper will tell the story of emerging
methods for imaging and analysis culminating in a personal account of
the discovery, the people involved, and the technical approaches used,
which will be hugely important for the decipherment of the Herculaneum
papyri.

SCS/AIA Annual Meeting: Presentation by The Institute for Digital Archaeology
Jan
7
7:30 pm19:30

SCS/AIA Annual Meeting: Presentation by The Institute for Digital Archaeology

  • Yosemite B, Hilton Union Square

Over the last decade, the fusion of traditional techniques with high technology has brought about a profoundly exciting expansion in the scope of archaeological research. The Million Image Database Program of The Institute for Digital Archaeology is an international project seeking to explore how these expanding boundaries might affect the ambitions of twenty-first century archaeology. At the heart of the initiative is the application of a suite of innovative techniques for the documentation, preservation, and restoration of at-risk archaeological sites across the globe, with a particular focus on the Middle East. The Program is providing thousands of volunteers with stereoscopic photography equipment capable of producing images that can be used to create detailed maps of sites, and 3D computer models of architectural structures. These images and models will populate a large-scale publically accessible visual database, created in collaboration with UNESCO. This resource will form an ever-growing archaeological catalog, bringing together scholarly information, raising awareness of cultural heritage preservation, and providing a new platform for the identification of stolen and trafficked objects. In parallel, the Program is pioneering the use of 3D printing in concrete as a platform for the restoration and reconstruction of architectural archaeological structures — a technology which potentially brings new life to sites damaged or destroyed by conflict or natural disaster, and transforms the speed, scale, and affordability of large-scale reconstruction.

The Missing: Rebuilding the Past
Dec
9
Feb 5

The Missing: Rebuilding the Past

  • Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery

The Missing: Rebuilding the Past is the first exhibit to showcase the efforts of artists and scholars to resist ISIS and other forms of destruction of the past through creative and innovative reactions, protests, and reconstructions. 

A Future in 3D - Christmas Lecture
Dec
3
6:30 pm18:30

A Future in 3D - Christmas Lecture

  • Rewley House

Dr Alexy Karenowska
Department of Physics, Magdalen College, and Institute for Digital Archaeology
University of Oxford

The Million Image Database Program of The Institute for Digital Archaeology, is an international project exploring the application of innovative technologies to the documentation, preservation, and restoration of at-risk archaeological sites across the globe. The Program is providing thousands of volunteers with stereoscopic photography equipment capable of producing images that can be used to create detailed virtual maps of sites, and 3D computer models of architectural structures. These images and models will populate a large-scale publicly accessible visual database created in collaboration with UNESCO. In parallel, the Program is pioneering the use of 3D printing in concrete as a platform for the restoration and reconstruction of architectural archaeological structures — a technology which potentially brings new life to sites damaged or destroyed by conflict or natural disaster, and transforms the speed, scale, and affordability of large-scale reconstruction beyond all recognition.

More Information: http://www.oxon.bcs.org/event/a-future-in-3d-christmas-lecture/

Greece vs. Rome with Boris Johnson and Mary Beard
Nov
19
8:00 pm20:00

Greece vs. Rome with Boris Johnson and Mary Beard

Here the whole podcast Here. 

Mr. Roger Michel meets Boris Johnson during his Intelligence Squared debate with Prof. Mary Beard. 

On November 19th Intelligence Squared hosted the ultimate clash of civilisations: Greece vs Rome. It was also the ultimate clash of intellectual titans. Boris Johnson, Mayor of London and ardent classicist, made the case for Greece; while Mary Beard, Professor of Classics at Cambridge and redoubtable media star, championed Rome.

As Boris argued, the Greeks got there first: in literature, history, art and philosophy. The Iliad and the Odyssey are the earliest surviving epic poems, the foundations on which European literature was built. The Greek myths – the tales of Oedipus, Heracles and Persephone, to name but a few – contain the archetypal plot elements of hubris and nemesis on which even Hollywood films depend today.

But as Mary Beard reminded us, Greece eventually lost out to Rome. Little Athens, with its loose-knit, short-lived empire, had nothing to rival Rome’s scale. From Hadrian’s Wall to north Africa, from Spain’s Atlantic coast to Babylon, the Romans stamped a permanent legacy on architecture, language, religion and politics.

Honouring Roger Bagnall 2015
Nov
13
7:00 pm19:00

Honouring Roger Bagnall 2015

  • Magdalen College Oxford

Classicists gathered at Magdalen College Oxford to honour the contributions of Prof. Roger Bagnall to the field of classics. 

Europeana AGM 2015
Nov
3
4:00 pm16:00

Europeana AGM 2015

  • Rijskmuseum Amsterdam

Dr. Alexy Karenowska spoke at the Europeana AGM in Amsterdam on November 3rd, 2015. Her talk on the open-access nature of the Million Image Database was part of Track 2 of the conference: Taking the Commons Approach. 

 

IDA Conference 2015
May
30
May 31

IDA Conference 2015

  • Ioannu Centre, Oxford

Many thanks to the Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies. Media from the conference, including selected papers, can be found on the Annual Conference tab of he IDA website. 

Presentations included . . . 

Benjamin Althsuler, Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents

The Importance of Digital Archaeology in Cultural Heritage Preservation

Frederick Baker, University of Cambridge

Pitoti: Digital Rock-art from Ancient Europe

Rebecca Benefiel, Washington and Lee University

Digital Archaeology and The Graffiti of Herculaneum

Francesco D’Aiuto, Universitá Degli Studi Di Roma Tor Vergata

Imaging the Menander Palimpsest

Alexy Karenowska, University of Oxford

Magnetism in the Hellenistic Age

Thomas Mannack, The Classical Art Research Centre & The Beazley Archive

Digital resources and techniques for the study of Greek Pottery, A historical overview

Roger Michel, The Institute for Digital Archaeology

The Greek Aldines

Herbert Golder, 

On Reflection: Print in the digital age, when light comes to light

 

And keynote

Nigel Wilson

Applications of the New Technology in the Related Discipline of Palaeography